Housing developers must protect nature as new biodiversity law

The biodiversity net gain law, which states that developers can’t destroy local nature and development has to give extra provisions for nature, has come into force today (Monday 12 February).

Developers would also be required to attain a 10% biodiversity net gain on all substantial domestic, commercial, and mixed-use properties.

While many housing developers such as Berkeley Group have already been building new homes using biodiversity net gain, from today it will be mandatory for all companies as part of the government’s commitment to halt species decline by 2030.


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Environment minister Rebecca Pow said: “Biodiversity net gain will help us deliver the beautiful homes the country needs, support wildlife and create great places for people to live.”

Berkeley Group chief executive Rob Perrins added: “Biodiversity net gain is a positive step for the homebuilding industry and will bring nature back to our towns and cities.

“Putting this into practice on over 50 sites has been a hugely positive experience for Berkeley Group and these greener, wilder landscapes have huge benefits for the communities around them.

“The challenge now is to make sure that developers and planning authorities take a positive and collaborative approach to delivering biodiversity net gain across the country.

“This is a big change for everyone involved and we need to work together to unlock the full benefits for people, planet, and prosperity.”

Nature and the environmentNewsPolicyProperty

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